Nyack Backyard

“I can never read all the books I want; I can never be all the people I want and live all the lives I want. I can never train myself in all the skills I want. And why do I want? I want to live and feel all the shades, tones and variations of mental and physical experience possible in life. And I am horribly limited.”
— Sylvia Plath, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath (via inthemoodtodissolveinthesky)

(via gardenergal)

thefoodshow:

Rosemary And Garlic Roasted Pork Loin


I have a new fav recipe for pork roast: You just rub it with any meat rub you like, stick in a few slivers of garlic here an there, then put it in at 275° oven for six hours. Yep, six hours - tender meat, super crispy skin.

thefoodshow:

Rosemary And Garlic Roasted Pork Loin

I have a new fav recipe for pork roast: You just rub it with any meat rub you like, stick in a few slivers of garlic here an there, then put it in at 275° oven for six hours. Yep, six hours - tender meat, super crispy skin.

(via balancingegoasaleo)

permacultureandhomesteading:

“Sowing Seeds in the Desert, a summation of those years of travel and research, is Fukuoka’s last major work-and perhaps his most important. Fukuoka spent years working with people and organizations in Africa, India, Southeast Asia, Europe, and the United States, to prove that you could, indeed, grow food and regenerate forests with very little irrigation in the most desolate of places. Only by greening the desert, he said, would the world ever achieve true food security.”
Available here: Sowing Seeds in the Desert: Natural Farming, Global Restoration, and Ultimate Food Security

permacultureandhomesteading:

Sowing Seeds in the Desert, a summation of those years of travel and research, is Fukuoka’s last major work-and perhaps his most important. Fukuoka spent years working with people and organizations in Africa, India, Southeast Asia, Europe, and the United States, to prove that you could, indeed, grow food and regenerate forests with very little irrigation in the most desolate of places. Only by greening the desert, he said, would the world ever achieve true food security.”

Available here: Sowing Seeds in the Desert: Natural Farming, Global Restoration, and Ultimate Food Security

(via hqcreations)

I spent an hour in my community garden plot yesterday pulling out my sweet potatoes. It was nice to see that the alyssum is still in bloom and has its own tiny alyssum-sized bees buzzing around it. Allyssum in full bloom is one of my favorite scents in the garden! The broccoli flowers have their own much larger visitors. The purple flowers you see growing near the alyssum are Texas bluebonnets - you won’t find many of those up here in Nyack. The beets are still producing new leaves. The peppers are still producing new flowers. My neighbor is growing bitter melon and I see that it’s also still making new fruits.

smallgardenbigdreams:

tattiehoking:

I made a new vegetable bed today out of driftwood. It looks much better than the square ones and I don’t think it will have as many slugs hiding in it as the stone beds do. I think as the wood decays it will add nutrients to the soil too.

Pictured are poached egg plants which are great companion plants in the fight against aphids. other plants in the beds pictured are leeks, kale, rocket, wild onion potatoes, Jerusalem artichokes, rhubarb and peas.

Beautiful raised beds

(via misadventured-piteous-overthrows)

biodiverseed:

cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse. Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.

1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.

2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.

3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.

4. More kindling.

5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.

6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.

7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.

8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.

9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.

10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.
Dobby the kitten approves.

A very nice example of sheet mulching, a.k.a. “lasagna gardening." As the OP noted, these methods are very easily combined with hugelkultur.

(via flowerfood)

Fall color in my backyard with Betsy today.