Nyack Backyard

kihaku-gato:

biodiverseed:

Grow the #Paw Paw (Asimina triloba) for free, with biodiverseed​!

This is the last call for those of you who want to try growing the Paw Paw (hardy to zone 6A-8B, not drought-tolerant)! I’m putting in a request for the seeds from the Horticultural Research Extension at Kentucky State University, where they have an awesome program devoted to the Indiana Banana: the largest edible fruit native to North America. funeralfarm will be distributing the seeds for those of us not in the United States. Sadly, I think biosecurity is too tight to allow export to Australia for this project.

To request free seeds, please use this form.

Paw Paw trees are not known to be invasive anywhere, but if you are outside of the native range of this plant, follow the usual precautions with ornamentals. This tree forms clonal patches with its roots.

Since these seeds require stratification (and possibly scarification), I’d recommend you either:

  • Have a fridge drawer available, that is around 4˚C
  • Live in a suitable temperate climate, where you can sow the seeds outdoors in the Fall

Paw Paw trees tolerate very little light in their first year, as they are understory trees, so often growers shelter the young seedling in a length of PVC pipe, gradually allowing it more and more sun exposure. In an edible forest garden, they are in the “low tree layer.”

I am interested in how successful germination is using different sowing techniques, in different parts of the world, so if you receive seeds please feel free to send in updates or pictures. I will work on some sort of database where anyone interested can report some basic data on germination, but for now, use the hashtag #biodiverseedpawpawproject.

I germinated my first successful tree in a dark bathroom closet, and it seems to be doing very well with the humidity in there!

So, who is ready to do some horticultural science?

#garden science #germination

I still wish my own RBG gardens batch of pawpaw seed had sprouted… *still waiting just in case* though I still hope to give pawpaw germination another round!

Gonna give it a shot!

(via hqcreations)

paintedgoat:

hyggehaven:

geometricsorcery:

biodiverseed:

Green Globe Artichoke, from seed.
(Find seeds: USA / Canada / UK & Europe)
Artichokes normally bloom in their second year, but you can trick them into blooming early by allowing the new seedlings to harden off very early in the springtime, as the temperature hovers between 0˚C and 10˚C. The plants, believing they have experienced winter, will produce an edible flower bud several months later.
Related: Germinating Artichokes
#artichoke #heirloom seeds #garden hacks #garden science

I wonder if this works in US zone 5

Globe artichokes are USDA zone 6 hardy if mulched well, and USDA zone 5 in mild winters. You can grow perennial artichokes in pots in USDA zones 4-5 if you move the root ball somewhere slightly warmer over winter (like a garage). You can also fill a large upside-down pot with compost once the plant has died back, and the heat from the compost will keep the roots warmer over winter. The volume of the compost needs to be quite large to generate enough heat, but it should work.

Or you can buy them from the nursery I get mine from that hardens them off for you.  Them you can treat them as annuals. Although, one isn’t producing a flower stalk, so I suppose the method isn’t foolproof.

Great info, thanks! I started artichokes early this year but probably not early enough to trick them into hardening off.  And they are big but show no signs of blooming.  I’m in zone 7 and they’re in a community plot that requires us to have everything out by Nov. So not sure if I should dig them out and pot them or put them in my yard. Anyone have any advice? Ever tried to transplant them?

paintedgoat:

hyggehaven:

geometricsorcery:

biodiverseed:

Green Globe Artichoke, from seed.

(Find seeds: USA / Canada / UK & Europe)

Artichokes normally bloom in their second year, but you can trick them into blooming early by allowing the new seedlings to harden off very early in the springtime, as the temperature hovers between 0˚C and 10˚C. The plants, believing they have experienced winter, will produce an edible flower bud several months later.

Related: Germinating Artichokes

#artichoke #heirloom seeds #garden hacks #garden science

I wonder if this works in US zone 5

Globe artichokes are USDA zone 6 hardy if mulched well, and USDA zone 5 in mild winters. You can grow perennial artichokes in pots in USDA zones 4-5 if you move the root ball somewhere slightly warmer over winter (like a garage). You can also fill a large upside-down pot with compost once the plant has died back, and the heat from the compost will keep the roots warmer over winter. The volume of the compost needs to be quite large to generate enough heat, but it should work.

Or you can buy them from the nursery I get mine from that hardens them off for you. Them you can treat them as annuals. Although, one isn’t producing a flower stalk, so I suppose the method isn’t foolproof.

Great info, thanks! I started artichokes early this year but probably not early enough to trick them into hardening off. And they are big but show no signs of blooming. I’m in zone 7 and they’re in a community plot that requires us to have everything out by Nov. So not sure if I should dig them out and pot them or put them in my yard. Anyone have any advice? Ever tried to transplant them?

(via hqcreations)

“Weather means more when you have a garden. There’s nothing like listening to a shower and thinking how it is soaking in around your green beans.”
— Marcelene Cox (via bestofthegarden)

(via kitchengardener)

Nature rarer uses Yellow
Than another Hue.
Saves she all of that for Sunsets
Prodigal of Blue


Spending Scarlet, like a Woman
Yellow she affords
Only scantly and selectly
Like a Lover’s Words.

— Emily Dickinson, “J:1045” (via litverve)
artamanen:

A Cabbage Garden Arthur Melville 1877

artamanen:

A Cabbage Garden
Arthur Melville
1877

(via tropicalhomestead)

jackassgardener:

biodiverseed:

natureisthegreatestartist:

An old canoe becomes an imaginative garden bed. Whatever floats your boat!

I think this is a great idea, but I’d also be a little careful with this one. See how the paint is chipping? Often older canoes have been painted with paints that contain lead.
In Canada, for example, “paint manufacturers voluntary phased out the use of lead in paint by the end of the 1990s." If you don’t know how old the boat is, and depending on what country you are in, it could still be covered in lead-containing paint, which will end up accumulating in your soil. According to soil scientists, paint chips are a common way for soil to become lead contaminated, and at high concentrations, it can make it in to your crops.
Lead can cause serious neurological defects in children, and there is no agreed-upon level of safe exposure.
This is sort of like the ever-popular pallet garden: pallets contain formaldehyde and methyl bromide, are extremely flammable (not to mention explosive), up to 10% of them test positive for e. coli, and 3% of them test positive for Listeria, which has a 20% mortality rate. these projects are made with the best of intention, but they are often not known to be serious disease vectors.
This has been your biodiverseed public health PSA of the day.

#garden hacks #diy #upcycle #health

this is why i eat all my lead BEFORE i plant things.

jackassgardener:

biodiverseed:

natureisthegreatestartist:

An old canoe becomes an imaginative garden bed. Whatever floats your boat!

I think this is a great idea, but I’d also be a little careful with this one. See how the paint is chipping? Often older canoes have been painted with paints that contain lead.

In Canada, for example, “paint manufacturers voluntary phased out the use of lead in paint by the end of the 1990s." If you don’t know how old the boat is, and depending on what country you are in, it could still be covered in lead-containing paint, which will end up accumulating in your soil. According to soil scientists, paint chips are a common way for soil to become lead contaminated, and at high concentrations, it can make it in to your crops.

Lead can cause serious neurological defects in children, and there is no agreed-upon level of safe exposure.

This is sort of like the ever-popular pallet garden: pallets contain formaldehyde and methyl bromide, are extremely flammable (not to mention explosive), up to 10% of them test positive for e. coli, and 3% of them test positive for Listeria, which has a 20% mortality rate. these projects are made with the best of intention, but they are often not known to be serious disease vectors.

This has been your biodiverseed public health PSA of the day.

#garden hacks #diy #upcycle #health

this is why i eat all my lead BEFORE i plant things.

(Source: facebook.com)

allotment86:

Vegetables You Can Grow In The Shade.


Types Of Shade
It’s not easy to describe and compare types of shade but this should help you determine what you’ve got.
1. Partial or Half Shade
5-6 hours of sun per day, mainly in the afternoon when the sun is strongest.
Garden beds that receive this same amount of sun in the mornings are considered ‘light shade’ and plants preferring half shade will not grow as large or quickly with the same amount of morning sun but they’ll still grow.
2. Dappled Shade, or Light Shade
This type of shade is usually created by the canopy of trees overhead.
Light still gets through but it’s not harsh and the total effect is less light than partial or half shade areas.
3. Open Shade, Full Shade, or Dense Shade 
Whether the shade is created from an obstruction like a house, or dense tree canopies overhead, these deeper shade areas are not suitable for veggies.
List of Veggies That Grow In The Shade
There is a hierarchy here, ranging from veggies like broccoli and Brussels sprouts that prefer a fair amount of sun (partial or half shade), to the salad greens (including mesclun mix) that do fine in dappled and light shade.
Afternoon sun is the strongest and preferable but you’ve got what you’ve got. Try stuff out and see how it works.
The amount of sun listed here is the minimum that will still provide a successful harvest.
5 hours of afternoon sun per day This group includes brassicas (edible buds).
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Swiss Chard (stalks)
4-5 hours of afternoon sun per day This groups includes many root vegetables.
Beans
Beets
Carrots
Celery
Celeriac
Collards
Pak Choy
Peas
radishes
swede, turnip
3-4 hours of afternoon sun per day Edible leaves enjoy some shade and this helps prevent bolting.
Rocket
Kale
Lettuce
Mizuna
Spinach
Swiss Chard (leaves)
3 hours of afternoon sun per day
Culinary Herbs
Mustard Greens
2 hours of afternoon sun per day There are some salad greens that do fine with minimal sun. If this is all you’ve got, try growing them and see how they do.
Asian Greens
Mesclun Mix, “assorted small, young salad leaves”.
source   Empress of Dirt.

allotment86:

Vegetables You Can Grow In The Shade.

Types Of Shade

It’s not easy to describe and compare types of shade but this should help you determine what you’ve got.

1. Partial or Half Shade

  • 5-6 hours of sun per day, mainly in the afternoon when the sun is strongest.
  • Garden beds that receive this same amount of sun in the mornings are considered ‘light shade’ and plants preferring half shade will not grow as large or quickly with the same amount of morning sun but they’ll still grow.

2. Dappled Shade, or Light Shade

  • This type of shade is usually created by the canopy of trees overhead.
  • Light still gets through but it’s not harsh and the total effect is less light than partial or half shade areas.

3. Open Shade, Full Shade, or Dense Shade 

  • Whether the shade is created from an obstruction like a house, or dense tree canopies overhead, these deeper shade areas are not suitable for veggies.

List of Veggies That Grow In The Shade

There is a hierarchy here, ranging from veggies like broccoli and Brussels sprouts that prefer a fair amount of sun (partial or half shade), to the salad greens (including mesclun mix) that do fine in dappled and light shade.

Afternoon sun is the strongest and preferable but you’ve got what you’ve got. Try stuff out and see how it works.

The amount of sun listed here is the minimum that will still provide a successful harvest.

5 hours of afternoon sun per day
This group includes brassicas (edible buds).

  • Broccoli
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Swiss Chard (stalks)

4-5 hours of afternoon sun per day
This groups includes many root vegetables.

  • Beans
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Celeriac
  • Collards
  • Pak Choy
  • Peas
  • radishes
  • swede, turnip

3-4 hours of afternoon sun per day
Edible leaves enjoy some shade and this helps prevent bolting.

  • Rocket
  • Kale
  • Lettuce
  • Mizuna
  • Spinach
  • Swiss Chard (leaves)

3 hours of afternoon sun per day

  • Culinary Herbs
  • Mustard Greens

2 hours of afternoon sun per day
There are some salad greens that do fine with minimal sun. If this is all you’ve got, try growing them and see how they do.

  • Asian Greens
  • Mesclun Mix, “assorted small, young salad leaves”.

source   Empress of Dirt.

Stewart Park on Lake Cayuga, Ithaca, NY

Stewart Park on Lake Cayuga, Ithaca, NY

Corning Glass Museum, Corning, NY #glass

Corning Glass Museum, Corning, NY #glass