Nyack Backyard

Some color from my backyard today


A girl gets into a car in front of a house covered in Bignonia vines, Florida, autochrome, 1920s-30s.

A girl gets into a car in front of a house covered in Bignonia vines, Florida, autochrome, 1920s-30s.

(Source: laurencephilomene, via hyggehaven)

biodiverseed:

I have the same thoughts on this as I do guerrillla grafting.
TL;DR:
Sidewalks are sites of a lot of toxic runoff (including heavy metals), as well as airbourne particulate emissions from vehicles.
People walk their dogs, along them, who urinate and defecate in these spaces. This is not neccessarily bad, as long as it doesn’t touch food. It can be safely taken care of with a worm tower and a poop scoop.
People often feel embarrassed, distrusting, or ashamed getting their food from roadside sources, and so the food is left to rot: attracting wasps.
Tree roots can disrupt public infrastructure (pipes, roads, sidewalks), which is a significant cost and can damage a community’s public works: this is decidedly not good if said community is already under-served. Call before you dig!
Planting flowers and local flora for native bees and pollinators is probably the best.
Planting food is best done in places with a lower pollution burden: ie. abandoned lots, rooftops, balconies, and parks.
This is not saying “foodwalks” are a bad idea in every scenario, just be careful and think twice, and maybe consult someone before going for it.
#guerrilla gardening #guerrilla grafting #forest gardening #edible landscaping #health


There is currently a “Please Pick” public food project underway in Nyack. Definitely some things to keep in mind.

biodiverseed:

I have the same thoughts on this as I do guerrillla grafting.

TL;DR:

  • Sidewalks are sites of a lot of toxic runoff (including heavy metals), as well as airbourne particulate emissions from vehicles.
  • People walk their dogs, along them, who urinate and defecate in these spaces. This is not neccessarily bad, as long as it doesn’t touch food. It can be safely taken care of with a worm tower and a poop scoop.
  • People often feel embarrassed, distrusting, or ashamed getting their food from roadside sources, and so the food is left to rot: attracting wasps.
  • Tree roots can disrupt public infrastructure (pipes, roads, sidewalks), which is a significant cost and can damage a community’s public works: this is decidedly not good if said community is already under-served. Call before you dig!
  • Planting flowers and local flora for native bees and pollinators is probably the best.
  • Planting food is best done in places with a lower pollution burden: ie. abandoned lots, rooftops, balconies, and parks.
  • This is not saying “foodwalks” are a bad idea in every scenario, just be careful and think twice, and maybe consult someone before going for it.

#guerrilla gardening #guerrilla grafting #forest gardening #edible landscaping #health

There is currently a “Please Pick” public food project underway in Nyack. Definitely some things to keep in mind.

(via hyggehaven)

missoulapubliclibrary:

universitybookstore:

Top Ten Challenged Books of 2013

  1. Captain Underpants (series) by Dav Pilkey
    Reasons: Offensive language, unsuited for age group, violence
  2. The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group, violence
  3. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, offensive language, racism, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  4. Fifty Shades of Grey by E.L. James
    Reasons: Nudity, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  5. The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
    Reasons: Religious viewpoint, unsuited to age group
  6. A Bad Boy Can Be Good for A Girl by Tanya Lee Stone
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, nudity, offensive language, sexually explicit
  7. Looking for Alaska by John Green
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  8. The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
    Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, homosexuality, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  9. Bless Me Ultima by Rudolfo Anaya
    Reasons: Occult/Satanism, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit
  10. Bone (series) by Jeff Smith
    Reasons: Political viewpoint, racism, violence

Source: ALA.org

To kick off banned books week, here’s a list of the 10 most challenged books of 2013.

(via paintedgoat)

Some people get excited about Miley Cyrus concerts. I get excited about farm tours! Yesterday the Hudson Valley Seed Library cut the ribbon on their new seed house in Accord, NY. They invited their members and customers for a tour and seed saving demo. We got a peek inside the building that will contain their offices, storage for the seeds, and a (rentable!) guest apartment. The director, Ken Greene, talked about their mission of hand-to hand sharing of heirloom seeds. A great organization to support and even more fun to visit.

upclosefromafar:

~My Hidden Nirvana~

upclosefromafar:

~My Hidden Nirvana~

(Source: uptomyhips, via tropicalhomestead)

kihaku-gato:

biodiverseed:

Grow the #Paw Paw (Asimina triloba) for free, with biodiverseed​!

This is the last call for those of you who want to try growing the Paw Paw (hardy to zone 6A-8B, not drought-tolerant)! I’m putting in a request for the seeds from the Horticultural Research Extension at Kentucky State University, where they have an awesome program devoted to the Indiana Banana: the largest edible fruit native to North America. funeralfarm will be distributing the seeds for those of us not in the United States. Sadly, I think biosecurity is too tight to allow export to Australia for this project.

To request free seeds, please use this form.

Paw Paw trees are not known to be invasive anywhere, but if you are outside of the native range of this plant, follow the usual precautions with ornamentals. This tree forms clonal patches with its roots.

Since these seeds require stratification (and possibly scarification), I’d recommend you either:

  • Have a fridge drawer available, that is around 4˚C
  • Live in a suitable temperate climate, where you can sow the seeds outdoors in the Fall

Paw Paw trees tolerate very little light in their first year, as they are understory trees, so often growers shelter the young seedling in a length of PVC pipe, gradually allowing it more and more sun exposure. In an edible forest garden, they are in the “low tree layer.”

I am interested in how successful germination is using different sowing techniques, in different parts of the world, so if you receive seeds please feel free to send in updates or pictures. I will work on some sort of database where anyone interested can report some basic data on germination, but for now, use the hashtag #biodiverseedpawpawproject.

I germinated my first successful tree in a dark bathroom closet, and it seems to be doing very well with the humidity in there!

So, who is ready to do some horticultural science?

#garden science #germination

I still wish my own RBG gardens batch of pawpaw seed had sprouted… *still waiting just in case* though I still hope to give pawpaw germination another round!

Gonna give it a shot!

(via hqcreations)

paintedgoat:

hyggehaven:

geometricsorcery:

biodiverseed:

Green Globe Artichoke, from seed.
(Find seeds: USA / Canada / UK & Europe)
Artichokes normally bloom in their second year, but you can trick them into blooming early by allowing the new seedlings to harden off very early in the springtime, as the temperature hovers between 0˚C and 10˚C. The plants, believing they have experienced winter, will produce an edible flower bud several months later.
Related: Germinating Artichokes
#artichoke #heirloom seeds #garden hacks #garden science

I wonder if this works in US zone 5

Globe artichokes are USDA zone 6 hardy if mulched well, and USDA zone 5 in mild winters. You can grow perennial artichokes in pots in USDA zones 4-5 if you move the root ball somewhere slightly warmer over winter (like a garage). You can also fill a large upside-down pot with compost once the plant has died back, and the heat from the compost will keep the roots warmer over winter. The volume of the compost needs to be quite large to generate enough heat, but it should work.

Or you can buy them from the nursery I get mine from that hardens them off for you.  Them you can treat them as annuals. Although, one isn’t producing a flower stalk, so I suppose the method isn’t foolproof.

Great info, thanks! I started artichokes early this year but probably not early enough to trick them into hardening off.  And they are big but show no signs of blooming.  I’m in zone 7 and they’re in a community plot that requires us to have everything out by Nov. So not sure if I should dig them out and pot them or put them in my yard. Anyone have any advice? Ever tried to transplant them?

paintedgoat:

hyggehaven:

geometricsorcery:

biodiverseed:

Green Globe Artichoke, from seed.

(Find seeds: USA / Canada / UK & Europe)

Artichokes normally bloom in their second year, but you can trick them into blooming early by allowing the new seedlings to harden off very early in the springtime, as the temperature hovers between 0˚C and 10˚C. The plants, believing they have experienced winter, will produce an edible flower bud several months later.

Related: Germinating Artichokes

#artichoke #heirloom seeds #garden hacks #garden science

I wonder if this works in US zone 5

Globe artichokes are USDA zone 6 hardy if mulched well, and USDA zone 5 in mild winters. You can grow perennial artichokes in pots in USDA zones 4-5 if you move the root ball somewhere slightly warmer over winter (like a garage). You can also fill a large upside-down pot with compost once the plant has died back, and the heat from the compost will keep the roots warmer over winter. The volume of the compost needs to be quite large to generate enough heat, but it should work.

Or you can buy them from the nursery I get mine from that hardens them off for you. Them you can treat them as annuals. Although, one isn’t producing a flower stalk, so I suppose the method isn’t foolproof.

Great info, thanks! I started artichokes early this year but probably not early enough to trick them into hardening off. And they are big but show no signs of blooming. I’m in zone 7 and they’re in a community plot that requires us to have everything out by Nov. So not sure if I should dig them out and pot them or put them in my yard. Anyone have any advice? Ever tried to transplant them?

(via hqcreations)

“Weather means more when you have a garden. There’s nothing like listening to a shower and thinking how it is soaking in around your green beans.”
— Marcelene Cox (via bestofthegarden)

(via kitchengardener)